About Words of Liberation Thinking Aloud | Thinking Allowed

“Freedom is not something that anybody can be given. Freedom is something people take, and people are as free as they want to be.” ― James Baldwin, The Price of the Ticket


Hi, my name is Amir Ahmad Nasr. Welcome to Words of Liberation, a blog exploring questions of life and identity at the intersections of culture, technology, and current affairs.

Ultimately, it’s a blog about achieving personal and collective liberation in all aspects of our existence – from the sexual to the political, and the financial to the spiritual.

I write about writing and storytelling, bettering one’s self, speaking truth to power, and succeeding as an entrepreneur. I hope my words will be of some value to you on your own journey of liberation. Watch this video to learn my backstory in 1 minute and 46 seconds.



I am the formerly anonymous and provocative voice behind The Sudanese Thinker blog, which I began on April 14, 2006 until the revelation of my identity in 2011 at the height of the Arab Spring. In 2013, I made my authorial debut with my searing memoir and banned book My Isl@m: How Fundamentalism Stole My Mind – And Doubt Freed My Soul, which forced me to seek political asylum in Canada, the place I now call home. Words of Liberation is the continuation of that literary journey.

I am an MA in Philosophy dropout, occasional guitar-playing singer-songwriter, and as of 2014 a happily married man, with no kids. (The wifey and I may get a puppy though).

My parents – dad, a retired professor of folklore, and mom, a “neighborhood therapist” of sorts – tell me I was an unbearably curious and talkative child frequently lost in thought. Explains a few things I guess.

As much as I lament the tragedies of our human condition, I also believe we’re living in the most exciting time of our shared history. The Economist calls me “puckish” (aka playfully mischievous), and WIRED says I’m a “formidable speaker.” You can learn more about me here.

Sometimes I write as if I’m going to die tomorrow. You should too.